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  • Hyperactivity—Behavioral Issues in Child Care and Schools

    Hyperactivity is typically thought of as one part of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which can be diagnosed in children as early as age 4 years. However, because most preschoolers can be active and inattentive and have difficulty staying engaged at times, only medical and/or mental health

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  • Inhalants: What You Need to Know

    Young people today can face strong peer pressure to try drugs, including a group of substances called inhalants. Inhalant abuse is particularly a problem with younger teens, but even children as young as 5 or 6 years may try inhalants.

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  • Know the Facts About HIV and AIDS

    HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). While there is no cure for HIV, early diagnosis and treatment are very effective at keeping people healthy. In addition, there are things you can do to prevent getting HIV. Read on to learn more

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  • Learning Disabilities: What Parents Need to Know

    Your child will learn many things in life—how to listen, speak, read, write, and do math. Some skills may be harder to learn than others. If your child is trying his best to learn certain skills but is not able to keep up with his peers, it’s important to find out why. Your child may have a learning

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  • Making Healthy Decisions About Sex: Important Information For Teens

    Before you decide to have sex or if you are already having sex, you need to know how to stay healthy. Even if you think you know everything you need to know about sex, take a few minutes and read on. Your doctor wants to make sure you know the facts.

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  • Marijuana: What You Need to Know

    As a parent, you are your child’s first and best protection against drug use. The following is information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about marijuana and how to help your child say “No” to drug use. (Child refers to child or teen in this publication.)

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  • Media History

    Please check one answer for each question. If the question does not apply to your family (ie, you do not own a computer or mobile device), leave that section blank.

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  • Medicine and the Media: How to Make Sense of the Messages

    Your child is sick or hurt and the first thought on your mind is, “How can I make my child better?” That's natural. No parent wants his or her child to suffer. So how do you decide what medicines to give or treatments to try?

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  • Napping Difficulties—Behavioral Issues in Child Care and Schools

    Many children have sleep or nap problems at some time. Depending on the situations in which they live, their child care, and/or situations they experience, sleeping or napping problems may last a while or be resolved quickly. The most common cause of nap inconsistencies is being overtired and overstimulated.

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  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder—Behavioral Issues in Child Care and Schools

    Children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) perform repetitive patterns of compulsive behaviors in response to a strict internal rule or because they believe it will serve a purpose, such as protecting them. Compulsions decrease children’s distress level, or children believe that compulsions

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  • Physical Altercations—Behavioral Issues in Child Care and Schools

    A physical altercation is generally a confrontation, tussle, or display of physical aggression that may or may not result in injury. Physical altercations are distinguished from verbal altercations by the use of physical force or contact. Physical altercations may also be referred to as bullying or fighting.

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  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder—Behavioral Issues in Child Care and Schools

    Children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are most easily identified if caregivers and child care and early education professionals are aware that they have experienced a significant trauma in their past, including a motor vehicle crash, significant medical procedure, house fire, natural disaster,

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  • Ratings: Making Healthy Media Choices

    Research has shown that children are influenced by what they see and hear, especially at very young ages. To help parents make informed choices about what their children see and hear, many entertainment companies use ratings systems. Ratings give parents more information about the content of television

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  • Responding to Children's Emotional Needs During Times of Crisis: Information for Parents

    Pediatricians are often the first responders for children and families suffering emotional and psychological reactions to terrorism and other disasters. As such, pediatricians have a unique opportunity to help parents and other caregivers communicate

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  • Responding to Tantrums—Behavioral Issues in Child Care and Schools

    Tantrums are common in young children, with as many as 70% of children between the ages of 18 and 24 months having tantrums and 75% of children aged 3 to 5 years displaying tantrum behaviors. It is not unusual for a child between 18 and 60 months of age to have a tantrum per day, lasting between 90 seconds

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  • Selective Mutism—Behavioral Issues in Child Care and Schools

    Selective mutism is identified when a child who is able to speak at home does not speak in public settings, especially child care or school. While some children are shy in new settings, the shyness generally decreases as they become accustomed to the new setting. Children with selective mutism will remain

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